New Rules Questions: Robot Damage, Animal Damage and Encounters

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 1, 2017 - 8:09pm
Note to TerlObar: I had posted an earlier question and found some of the information I was looking for in Star Frontiersman issue 23. Since I couldn't figure out how to take this discussion down, I flagged it as "offensive" so it could be removed.

But now I have a new purpose for this posting.

I am working on a comprehensive set of Alpha Dawn combat rules here: http://starfrontiers.us/node/9676 and would certainl welcome any feedback. The idea is not to replace the game rules (I like them), but to incorporate the various other additional rules that were given in various magazines such as Dragon, Star Frontiersman, Frontier Explorer, etc. so it would be one comprehensive tool.

This combat booklet also includes missiles -- a conversion from Zebs.

Star Frontiersman issue 23 reran a Dragon magazine article called "A Shot in the Arm," which provided some special effects damage, and I know that there were other stories on ablative damage for PC characters.

I'm trying to work on a more generic chart for damage to robots and animals so I will try posting some ideas here for feedback.

Also, has anyone ever come up with some generic animal encounter tables? Something that might indicate when an animal might attack versus ignoring or fleeing from characters? 
 
Joe Cabadas
Comments:

Shadow Shack's picture
Shadow Shack
March 1, 2017 - 11:19pm
No title and no content in the post...looks like we have a bit of a bug here.
No, I'm not overly fond of Zeb's Guide. Nor do I have any qualms in stating why. Tongue out

My SF website

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 7:03am
Shadow Shack wrote:
No title and no content in the post...looks like we have a bit of a bug here.

The "bug" was my deletion of the original post -- I couldn't figure out how to remove it entirely.

However, I've repurposed my questions.
Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 7:07am
The "A Shot in the Arm" story gives a system for special damage to robots, which would include extra stamina points lost, "units of equipment damaged," etc.

I want something more akin to how vehicles can get damaged. I like the parts of the chart that give the following effects:

Explanation of Robot Damage

Body damage. -5 to hit with weapons because of internal damage.

Leg damage. -5 meters/turn on movement (unless robot has alternate movement system, such as rocket movement.

Arm damage. Attacker can choose attacked arm or tentacle, -9 to hit with any weapon held in that arm.

Arm joint damage. -14 to hit with a weapon in that arm, -2 damage for melee attacks.

Arm joints damage. No weapons may be fired from that arm, no melee attacks.

Brain casing damage. 50% chance of robot being stunned for d100 minutes (even if A-S implant is installed), -5 to hit with all weapons, 20% chance of a malfunction. All robots have brains, but a non-cybernetic robot’s brain is a computer.

Leg broken. -10 meters/turn on movement, -5 meters/turn to movement using alternate movement system because it also has been hit.

Body cracked. -10 to hit with all weapons, -5 meters/turn on movement, 20% chance of a malfunction.

Arm broken. No weapon can be fired from the arm, -5% to chances to repair it.

Arm joint broken. Same as arm broken, but a -25% to chances to repair it.

Brain casing cracked. Stunned for dl00 +20 minutes, 50% chance of being deactivated, -10 to hit with all weapons, 35% chance of a malfunction, -30% to chances to repair it.

Movement center damaged. Robot cannot move, -30% to chances to repair it.

Arm joints broken No weapons can be fired from the arm, -20% to chances to repair it.

Body and brain casing cracked. The same effects as body cracked and brain casing cracked combined. All damage and penalties are cumulative.

Brain casing broken. Automatically deactivated, -20 to hit with all weapons, -20 meters/turn on movement, 55% chance of malfunction, -50% to chances to repair.

Explosion. Everyone within 10 meters takes 7d10 damage (Reaction Speed check defense).

 

Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 4, 2017 - 11:49am
I just want to figure out a chart, like a vehicle damage chart, and not use the extra stamina/units of equipment lost section. Oh, I guess I should post the damage table from the "Shot in the Arm" article too.

Damage Results Table: Robots

Modified

1d10 roll

Stamina damage

Special damage

Units Lost

1 or less

0

None

0

2

5

Body damage

0

3

5

Leg damage

0

4

5

Arm damage

1

5-6

8

Arm joint damage

1

7

9

Arm joints damage

1

8

10

Brain casing damage

1

9-10

10

Leg broken

1

11

15

Body cracked

1

12-13

8

Arm Broken

1

14

8

Arm joint broken

1

15-16

15

Brain casing cracked

1

17

15

Movement center damaged

2

18

12

Arm joints broken

2

19

15

Body and Brain casing cracked

2

20-22

30

Brain casing broken

2

23+

1,000

Explosion (cannot be repaired)

15

Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 7:12am
So, basically, column 1 would be the place to roll for a damage result. Columns 2 and 4 would be eliminated.

As for the explosion result, perhaps that should be modified based upon what kind of battery source a robot is using. A tiny robot operating on a 20 SEU powerclip would not explode like a warbot would, for example.
Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 9:05pm
Hmm, I decided to look closer at the vehicle damage mechanic and I think I can convert it for use with remote weapons systems, such as the sentry gun from Star Frontiersman Magazine #5. The Alpha Dawn rules just had a brief blurb about them in the combat section, though the players need to face such a weapon in "Bugs in the System."

Here's what I've got.

Remote Weapons Systems

Besides the possibility of combating other characters, animals and robots, another hazard on the Frontier are remote weapon systems (RWS). These devices are usually controlled by computers using Robot Management programs.

The module “Bugs in the System” offered one such automated weapons turret that the characters needed to overcome. It ws equipped with two laser rifles and a grenade launcher and had 120 structure points.

Another example of a remote weapons system is the Sentry Gun, an automated heavy-weapons platform that is often used for perimeter defense.[1] Once the unit is placed into position, it may be specifically set to monitor targets in infrared or optical, depending on the profile of the target. In particular, targets with thermal or visual profiles, respectively.

To prevent the possibility of casualties by means of “friendly fire,” Sentry Gun’s control unit can be equipped to identify specific Identification – Friend or Foe (IFF) transponders. When a target enters its sensor range, the Sentry Gun will trigger IFF detection, through a coded, radio signal. If the Sentry Gun’s reads are positive, the target will be free to pass; otherwise, the weapon will open fire.

Chance to Hit. An automated remote gun have a basic chance to hit of 30%, plus 10 x the program's level.

Initiative Modifier. A remote weapon system’s IM is its level plus three.

Used by an Operator. A character can also operate a remote weapon system using a computer interface. Generally the base chance to hit is 30% plus 10% for each computer level (or the Security Systems: Activate and Operate subskill).

Features: All RWS systems require a power source, a computer link or a control module, and ammunition for its gun.

Damaging and Destroying a Remote Weapons System

Assume a remote weapons system, such as the sentry gun, has 5 structure points for every kilogram it weighs.

They can be mounted with power screens, one coat of spray armor, or skeinsuit-like armored plates.

Whenever a RWS is hit by gunfire, an exploding grenade or a a demolition charge, the attacking character must roll 2d10 on the Remote Weapons System Damage Table.

The number of dice of damage caused by the attack is added to the result. This number is modified by the type of RWS.

A separate roll is made for each successful attack.


Remote Weapons System Damage Table

# Dice Damage     + 2d10 Roll

Special damage

2-19

No effect

20-21

Turret mechanism damaged,

-1 IM, -10% to hit

22-23

Sensor damage, -10% to hit

24-25

Ammunition reloader damaged/power cord struck

26-27

Controller casing cracked, -20% to hit, -2 IM

28-29

Controller Casing broken, gun disabled

30+

Explosion: Battery/ammunition magazine hit (cannot be repaired)

 



Modifiers

 

Target is a sentry gun

0

Target is in a fortified turret

-2



Explanation of RWS Damage

No Effect. No extra damage was done to the remote weapon system.

Turret mechanism damaged. The RWS receives a -1 point penalty on its initiative rolls while its attack number is reduced by -10%. This effect is cumulative. If the gun’s IM or to-hit number is reduced to zero then it cannot fire until repaired.

Sensor damage. The weapon system’s sensors have been damaged and its attack number is reduced by -10%. This effect is cumulative. If the gun’s to-hit number is reduced to zero then it cannot fire until repaired.

Ammunition Reloader Damaged/Power Cord Struck. It the gun turret has an energy weapon, then a power cord was severed. If it relies on ammunition, such as a machine gun, then the reloading mechanism was damaged. It cannot fire. If a RWS has more than one weapon, one of its systems was knocked out of commission. This effect is cumulative. Once all ammo reloaders or power cords are damaged, the unit will not work until repaired.

Controller Casing Cracked. Damage has occurred to the control system. The RWS now has a -20$ penalty and its Initiative Modifier is reduced by 2 points. This effect is cumulative. If the gun’s IM or to-hit number is reduced to zero then it cannot fire until repaired.

Controller Casing Broken, Gun Disabled. The casing to the control unit has been breached and the circuitry was heavily damaged. The gun system will no longer work until it receives a major repair, including replacement parts, which may or may not be available.

Explosion. The ammunition magazine was hit, setting off the rounds or the power battery was hit, causing an explosion which will have a blast similar to a fragmentation grenade. If the ammo magazine was empty and/or the unit does not have an internal battery, the hit has complete wrecked the RWS where it is no longer repairable.




[1] Jackson, Madin. “Sentry Guns,” Star Frontiersman Magazine, issue 5, pp. 17-18.


Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 9:06pm
I think I can use the similar mechanic for the robot damage chart.

That way, it's definitely Alpha Dawn based.
Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 11:06pm

Robot Combat

As with vehicles and characters, there is a limit to the number of weapons that a robot can handle. Most robots (except the “tin can” style) that have a pair of standard or anthropomorphic limbs can pick up and use normal weapons without penalty.

These weapons include grenades, man-portable heavy weapons such as the Ke-5000 (the Alpha Dawn heavy laser) and Ke-6000 (the Zebulon version of the heavy laser that causes slightly more damage per SEU used), a Rafflur M-10, a recoilless rifle, a machine gun, etc. They do get a penalty for firing two weapons.

Chance to Hit. As per the Alpha Dawn rules, a robot’s basic chance to hit is 30 percent plus 10 times the robot’s level (30% + RL x 10). This is the number used in both ranged and melee combat.

Initiative Modifier. A robot’s initiative modifier (IM) is its level plus three (IM = RL + 3). Other modifiers apply as usual.

Robot Melee Attacks. A robot gets one melee attack for every pair of limbs it has. When the robot attacks without a weapon, standard and anthropomorphic limbs cause 2d10 points of damage; heavy-duty limbs cause 6d10 points of damage.

If the robot uses a melee weapon, it causes whatever damage is normal.

Robot Ranged Attacks. A robot using a ranged weapon is treated exactly like a character and is subject to all the ranged combat modifiers. However, a robot cannot attack unless it has a restrain, self-defense or attack/defense program.

Computer Controlled Robots. A computer using a Robot Management program can remotely control the robot’s weapon systems. It will have a base chance to hit of 30 percent plus 10 times the program’s level (30% + 10 x Prog Level). The initiative modifier is the computer’s level plus three.

 

Robot Level

To-Hit

Initiative Modifier

1

40%

+4

2

50%

+5

3

60%

+6

4

70%

+7

5

80%

+8

6

90%

+9

7

100%

+10

8

110%

+11


 

Optional: Damaging a Robot

 

Whenever a robot is hit by gunfire, an exploding grenade or demolition charge, the attacking character must roll 2d10 on the Robot Damage Table. The number of dice of damage caused by the attack is added to the result. This number is modified by the type of robot.

 

A separate roll is made for each successful attack

 

 

Damage Results Table: Robots

# Dice Damage   + 2d10 Roll

Special damage

2-15

No effect

16-20

Body damage

21

Leg damage

22

Arm damage

23

Arm joint damage

24

Arm joints damage

25

Brain casing damage

26

Leg broken

27

Body cracked

28

Arm Broken

29

Arm joint broken

30

Brain casing cracked

31

Movement center damaged

32

Arm joints broken

33

Body and Brain casing cracked

34

Brain casing broken

35+

Explosion (cannot be repaired)

 

 

Modifiers

 

Robot is a microbot

+10

Robot has an ultralight/superlight body

+5

Robot has a light body

+2

Robot has a standard body

0

Robot has an anthropomorphic body

0

Robot has a standard-reinforced body

-2

Robot is a security robot

-1

Robot is a combat robot

-4

Robot has a heavy-duty body

-5

Robot is a warbot

-5

Robot has a heavy-duty reinforced body

-6

Robot has a super duty body

-8

 


Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 9:48pm

Optional: Damage Effects to Robots[1]

Explanation of Robot Damage

No Effect. No extra damage was done to the robot.

Body damage. The robot has a -5% penalt to hit with weapons due to internal damage.

Leg damage. -5 meters/turn on movement (unless robot has alternate movement system, such as rocket movement.)

Arm damage. Attacker can choose the damaged arm or tentacle; the robot has -9% penalty to hit with any weapon held in that arm.

Arm joint damage. Attacker can choose the damaged arm or tentacle; the robot has a -14% penalty to hit with a weapon in that arm, -2 damage for melee attacks.

Arm joints damage. Attacker can choose the damaged arm or tentacle. No weapons may be fired from that arm, no melee attacks.

Brain casing damage. There is a 50% chance of robot being stunned for d100 minutes (even if A-S implant is installed). When it can operate, it has a -5% penalty to hit with all weapons. Furthermore, there is a 20% chance of a malfunction.

Leg broken. Attacker can choose the leg broken. The robot’s ground movement is decreased by 10 meters/turn on movement. Otherwise movement is decreased by 5 meters/turn if the robot is using alternate movement system because it has been hit.

Body cracked. The robot has a -10% penalty to hit with all weapons. Movement is decreased by 5 meters/turn. There is a 20% chance of a malfunction.

Arm broken. No weapon can be fired from the arm, -5% to chances to repair it. The attacker can chose which arm or tentacle is broken.

Arm joint broken. Same as arm broken, but a -25% to chances to repair it. The attacker can chose which arm or tentacle is affected.

Brain casing cracked. The robot is stunned for dl00 +20 minutes. There is a 50% chance of it being deactivated. When it reboots, the robot has a -10% penalty to hit with all weapons, a 35% chance of a malfunction. A roboticist has a  -30% penalty when trying to repair the damage.

Movement center damaged. The robot cannot move, -30% to chances to repair it.

Arm joints broken No weapons can be fired from the arm, -20% to chances to repair it.

Body and brain casing cracked. The same effects as body cracked and brain casing cracked combined. All damage and penalties are cumulative.

Brain casing broken. Automatically deactivated, -20 to hit with all weapons, -20 meters/turn on movement, 55% chance of malfunction, -50% to chances to repair.

Explosion. The powerplant has been hit. Microbots explode with a force of 1d10 points, damaging everyone and everything within a 2 meter radius. Ultralight, Super Light and Light Body robots explode with a force of 3d10 points, with a 2 meter radius.

Robots with a type 1 parabattery explodes with a force of 5d10 points, with a 5 meter blast radius.

Robots with a type 2 parabattery explodes with a force of 7d10 with a 10 meter blast radius.

Robots with a type 3 parabattery explodes with a force of 10d10 with a 10 meter blast radius

Robots with a type 4 parabattery explodes with a force of 15d10 with a 15 meter blast radius

Characters can make a Reaction Speed check to avoid damage.



[1] Pamental, Jason and David Packard. “A Shot in the arm: A special damage system for Star Frontiers games,” Star Frontiersman, issue 23, pp. 63-68. Originally printed in Dragon Magazine, issue 124, August 1987.

Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 2, 2017 - 9:49pm
Does this game mechanic work for robots? It's a little simplier, I think, than then "Shot in the Arm" system.
Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 3, 2017 - 11:28am
Thinking about animal/plant encounters, I turned to Gamma World's first edition for a bit of additional TSR-esque inspiration.

When player characters enter areas keyed on the referee’s map that contain beings or plants that are likely to respond to their presence, there will be an encounter. The results of this encounter will depend upon what is encountered and the referee’s discretion.[1]

When players are traveling through large areas of unexplored wilderness terrain – on a world that has flora and fauna, the referee should check for random animal encounters once each day and night by rolling a single ten-sided die. A roll of 1 or 0 indicates an encounter.

If the adventurers are on the move and covering a certain distance during the time period when the encounter occurs, an appropriate die roll should be cast to determine what time this happens at. The exact location and terrain can be decided on by the referee.

As noted in Section I, there is a chance that the creature(s) may surprise the characters, requiring an Intuition check. This check would be modified by the terrain and the creature’s natural camouflage abilities (if any). For example, a predator stalking a character will know how to move stealthily, but a giant, dinosaur-like herbivore with the bulk to defend itself, may serenely munch on its food, ignoring the characters unless they approach too close or cause a disturbance.

It is important for a referee to play toe roles of creatures encountered in such a way to challenge the ingenuity of the players.



[1] Ward, James M. and Gary Jaquet, Gamma World, 2nd printing; (TSR Games), August 1978, p. 21

Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 4, 2017 - 11:51am
Repurposed post here:

Thinking about creature reactions to characters, here's a few obvious things for a referee to consider:

Animal encounter reactions

Creature is a carnivore

·         Is fed

·         Is hungry

·         Likes to stalk prey

·         Character wounded or disabled

·         Character near den/young

·         Character doing something to make loud noise, etc. to scare creature away

Creature is omnivore

·         Is fed

·         Is hungry

·         Character wounded or disabled

·         Character near den/young

·         Character doing something to make loud noise, etc. to scare creature away

Creature is herbivore

·         Skittish

·         Has strong defenses

·         Much smaller than characters/vehicles

·         Characters invading its territory

·         Herd animals with bulls or dominant females that defend territory/young

So, these could be ideas to create modifiers for some sort of generalized creature reaction table. Did AD&D have something like this or was it more along the lines the characters encounter a creature and there's always a fight?

A lot of times, characters may not even know when they have close encounters with ferocious animals if the animals are fed/content at the time.

My idea for creating a general creature reaction table is for those unplanned, random encounters that can occur during an adventure.


Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 3, 2017 - 11:28am
Much of the rest will come straight out of the Alpha Dawn rulebook:

Creature Reactions. A creature's reaction to a character depends on the animal's temperament and what the character does. The creature may be naturally timid, curious or aggressive; it may be hungry, or it might have just eaten. A character can affect the creature's reaction by ignoring it, coaxing it with food, or frightening it with fire, loud noises or flashes of light.

The referee must use his judgment in these cases, but several things to consider including:

Intelligence. Intelligent creatures will not be frightened by a burning torch, clanging frying pans, etc. Creatures with low intelligence, however, might be easily startled or frightened away by these actions.

Experience. A creature is less likely to be afraid of something it has seen before, unless the previous experience was very painful or frightening.

Size. Large creatures often are harder to frighten then small ones. (Also see Target Size on page 12).

Type. Carnivores tend to be more aggressive and harder to frighten than herbivores, which tend to be timid. Omnivores tend to be curious.

Temperament. If a creature is naturally aggressive, it may attack creatures much larger than itself with very little fear. Timid creatures try to avoid fighting whenever they can.

Motivation. Any creature that fights has a reason for fighting. Even naturally shy and weak creatures may fight savagely to defend their lair, their territory or their young. Those that are cornered or wounded, sensing that they must fight or die, often fight ferociously and without fear.

Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 3, 2017 - 3:18pm
But, it still begs the question, what kind of generic creature/plant encounter table could be created?

First one has to do with the issue of surprise and what modifiers should be applied to characters' Intuition ability checks.

Anyone have any ideas?

Addition at 5:17 pm 3/3/2017

I just thought of something so I'll add it here:

Animal surprise modifiers for Intuition checks

Creature is in its natural environment   -5

Creature is out of its natural environment +10

Creature is tiny -10

Creature is small -5

Creature is medium 0

Creature is large +10

Creature is giant +15

Creature stalks its prey -5

Creature lies in weight for prey -10

Creature is a herd/flock animal in a herd +15

Does this seem reasonable?

 

Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
March 4, 2017 - 11:47am
I think the robot damage chart and modifiers need a bit of adjustment. It seems a little too hard to get a catastrophic event.

Addendum: I altered the proposed damage table and modifiers to this scheme.

Robot Damage Table

# Dice Damage     + 2d10 Roll

Special damage

2-15

No effect

16-17

Body damage

18

Leg damage

19

Arm damage

20

Arm joint damage

21

Arm joints damage

22

Brain casing damage

23

Leg broken

24

Body cracked

25

Arm Broken

26

Arm joint broken

27

Brain casing cracked

28

Movement center damaged

29

Arm joints broken

30

Body and Brain casing cracked

31

Brain casing broken

32+

Explosion (cannot be repaired)

 

Modifiers

 

Robot is a microbot

+10

Robot has an ultralight/superlight body

+5

Robot has a light body

+2

Robot has a standard body

0

Robot has an anthropomorphic body

0

Robot has a standard-reinforced body

-1

Robot is a security robot

-1

Robot is a combat robot

-2

Robot has a heavy-duty body

-3

Robot is a warbot

-4

Robot has a heavy-duty reinforced body

-4

Robot has a super duty body

-5

Joe Cabadas

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JCab747
March 15, 2017 - 8:55am

Some other Creature Encounter ideas from ExileinParadise

Senses

Movement Modes

Loner, Packs?

Hunger, Thirst

Sleep

Curiosity

Mating Season?

Hibernation?

Territorial?

·         no territorial area

·         territorial area small such as home or nest only

·         territorial area large

·         territorial area changes with the season

·         territorial area depends on young (how?)

·         changes territorial area (why?)

·         marks or patrols territory

·         territorial defense against its own kind only

·         territorial defense against one sex only

·         territorial to exclude one other species

·         territorial to exclude all intruders

·         only one sex defends the territory

·         attacks intruders, content to drive away

·         attacks intruders, will try to kill

·         will defend territory until dead

·         special territory such as property concept

Lair or Nest?

·         never builds a nest

·         builds big nest

·         builds a new nest every year

·         builds false or dummy nests (why?)

·         builds concealed or camouflaged nest

·         builds complex nest such as tunnel network

·         builds nest, specific shape such as triangular

·         secretes special substance to build nest

·         makes use of natural nest or lair such as cave

·         steals another's nest or lair (same species?)

·         only uses nest or lair abandoned by another

·         only one sex builds nest

·         only one sex uses nest or lair at specific times

·         only uses nest or lair at specific times

·         mates only in nest or lair

·         periodically moves or changes nest or lair

·         communal nest or lair that is shared with others

·         one sex never leaves nest or lair (which?)

·         nest or lair serves unusual function such as larder

·         decorates nest or lair (what with?)

·         will defend nest or lair (to the death?)

Intelligence Level?

·         plant-like, automatic responses only, that is it always reacts the same way regardless of the stimuli triggering the action.

·         plant-like, variable responses, that is reaction varies according to varying stimuli, only reacts, does not initiate action

·         stagnant intelligence, able to recognize food source and own kind such as possible mates, reactions vary accordingly

·         stagnant intelligence, recognizes food source, own kind, and is aware of surroundings such as has set responses triggered by fear

·         latent intelligence, recognizes food source, own kind, and is aware of surroundings, able to make priority judgements such as can assess danger, avoid enemies, etc

·         latent intelligence, potential to imitate others, may mimic or copy, might pickup simple tricks

·         active intelligence, may override instincts if reason such as overcome fear of fire to escape, can be taught simple tricks

·         active intelligence, aware of basic intentions of others, may respond with subtlety such as could attempt to please

·         vibrant intelligence, able to work out simple ideas for itself such as how to open door, how to attract attention, etc

·         vibrant intelligence, may experiement to try and achieve a desired aim such as pile items together to ake a platform to reach food

·         dynamic intelligence, able to cope with more than one idea at once, able to adjust rapidly to changes in situation

Joe Cabadas

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JCab747
March 15, 2017 - 8:56am

Other Animal Encounter Ideas

A lot depends on a creature’s inclinations: how aggressive or passive it is – i.e. temperament. A Sathar attack monster will have a very aggressive temperament, but a rabbit would be timid.

Below is a rough encounter/reaction chart.

Attack

Aggressive Response

Neutral

Timid Response

Flees

Carnivore/Omnivore attacks without warning after lying in wait/silently stalking

Carnivores/Omnivores may stalk characters. If they get close enough, they may attack. May bark/bay/hiss ahead of time.

Carnivores may languish at a spot at a distance. Possibly feeding on a recent kill. Omnivores amble along, possibly coming close with curiosity but no apparent aggression.

Carnivores might be visible at a distance, either walking a parallel track or moving away from characters. Omnivores may make a brief appearance before moving into shelter.

Carnivore may be visible at a distance but will slink away, even leaving a kill behind.

Omnivores hide in den

Herbivores: Bulls charge, females kick/scratch/paw/bite, herd animals stampede toward characters

Herbivores: Put on a defense display by hissing, snorting, pawing dirt, etc. Bulls or females may charge at characters from a distance before pulling back.

Herbivores stay put, grazing in the open, but keep a wary eye on characters.

Herbivores visible at a distance. Will keep distance or move away from characters.

Herbivores move/run off soon after spotting characters.

 

Other modification factors depend on:

Character alone

Character in a group

Character injured

Day/Night factors: presence of campfire; presence of food

Wilderness versus cultivated area

Creatures’ previous experiences with hunting/weapons/robots and vehicles

Characters in vehicle/vehicle size

Joe Cabadas